Showing posts with label samurai. Show all posts
Showing posts with label samurai. Show all posts

18 Mar 2018

Slice n' Dice - The Samurai are in Action!

Only quite literally moments after taking delivery of a 15mm painted Samurai army from Lurkio (which you have already probably seen on this site) himself, the brave guys (and their probably less enthusiastic cattle) were placed immediately onto the table and pitched straight into a series of brutal battles at Burton Doubles 2018.


This resulted in a fiercely contested Samurai Civil War, two invasions of Europe which saw the Japanese warriors pit their katanas against the historically contemporary bearded axes and knightly lances of the English & Irish, and a return to South Asia for a final showdown with the Elephant Kingdom of the Tamils.


All 4 battles have their own unique write-ups, and this time also come with dedicated Podcasts (available in both Video and Audio formats), either of which will provide you with a running commentary on what approximated for the "thinking" of the two joint Samurai commanders.


The full Samurai spectrum of photos, captions and Hannibal analysis is also - as usual - provided for your delight and despair!

22 Feb 2018

15mm Samurai - and Samurai Terrain as well

A near-unique event today, as I post pictures of an army that I haven't painted myself... but don't worry, the usual bog-standard finishing is then in evidence with some bodged-together and over ambitious terrain !

The army is a 15mm Samurai force for L'Art de la Guerre. Mostly composed of Old Glory figures from Timecast, they are supplemented with a handful of Baueda Emeshi cavalry and a Dixon 28mm Great Commander.

All of them have been painted by Lurkio




The Samurai Village has already been posted online but this time there is also a self-made "ADLG Waterway" Samurai Castle wall to marvel at the amount of spare time I have to do stuff other than paint figures !




 The Walls come with a walk-through construction guide as well.

28 Jan 2018

A Samurai Town for L'Art de la Guerre

With my first-ever "I paid someone to paint it for me" army of Samurai currently on the basing table with Simon from Lurkio, I've been preparing some suitable terrain to go with the army for use at Badcon in a few weeks time.

First up is a small town, which has an extension to it;s base to make it a maximum sized piece for a 300 point game as well as the core 200 point version.

All of the buildings are from Oshiro Model Terrain, painted by me with a black undercoat and then drybrushed Army Painter Leather Brown for the wood, and white for the panels. The trees come from Model Tree Shop - a little more expensive than usual, but they do need to be as good as the houses.



Look carefully and you may see that the pond has some Koi carp painted in it.




 The terrain cloth is from Tiny Wargames



All of the buildings are just placed on the mdf baseplate, which has had some sand glued to it, a spray coat of ArmyPainter Desert Yellow followed by a dusting coat of Skeleton Bone.


 And, of course, the trees are also held in place with rare earth magnets. Because, well, why not go the whole hog eh?

The smaller section turns the main 200 point baseplate into a 300 point sized terrain piece, and with all of the pieces able to be taken off, it now works for the game as well as aesthetically.



I did need to drybrush the cherry blossom tree as it was a bit violently pink when I got it originally.

And, here are the men who will defend it...


2 Aug 2017

Carlos Vasquez and the Oiran

Carlos Vasquez is literally the new Hotness in Malifaux, a tanky Henchman with some exuberant flaming attacks.

I picked up the model, together with a box of Oiran on a recent trip to play at the English GT at Wayland Games, looking to expand my Showgirl crew.


Carlos is a slightly tricky but rewarding model to assemble and paint - the trickiness comes in whether or not to pin him. I did... find out why on this gallery


The Oiran are more straightforward, with some fiddly small pieces. Learn about my choice of colour scheme here.

2 Apr 2009

Samurai Armies 1467-1694

Samurai Armies 1467-1694 is the latest tome from Osprey in their Battle Orders series. Written by Stephen Turnbull (who along with Anthony Bryant has authored most of Osprey's range of Samurai books) this volume covers the period of Japanese history when the country was split into a multitude of rival princedoms and Samurai leaders fought for local - and eventually national - dominance.


The book itself is a weighty tome - no "8 pages of colour plates with some sketchy and largely irrelevant bonus text wrapped round it " Osprey this one!


This volume's 96 text-heavy pages do go into detail on Samurai history & politics of the period, giving an overview of how Japan changed and developed and highlighting the origins of the key players and clans. however - and most importantly for the likes of us gamers - there is absolutely stacks about warfare, battle tactics, uniforms, heraldry, with detailed maps and tactically astute accounts of battles and campaigns - in fact, everything from page 21 onwards is pretty much about the nitty gritty of warfare.

The book covers a number of key wargame-related topics in great detail, devoting many pages to each. The 17-page "Campaigns" section covers battlefield formations, communications, weaponry and how evolutions in weaponry (ie the arquebus) affected samurai tactics throughout this period.

20 Pages of "Strategic Engagement and Battlefield Movement" follows several key campaigns and uses them to highlight the classic array of formalized - and formula-busting - tactics used by key generals of the era.



A further 18 page section addresses in yet more detail the great battles of the Tokugawa Shoguns, from the unification of Japan through to the formation of the first real "Japanese" army and its abortive mission to subjugate Korea.

Summary:
For someone like myself for whom Samurai armies are not a passion, but something which fits into the "I'd like one one day just for the painting" the book is initially a somewhat challenging read, with a host of names of Japanese leaders and the rather confusing histories of various warring dynasties crammed into the first few pages.

However once this is out of the way (which it is quite soon) the book quickly kicks into a new life as something that almost seems to have been designed as a wargamers companion, and the speed at which I was able to take it all in increased dramatically.

By the time I'd finished I felt confident that the book had given me just enough history and background to put a context around what must be on many peoples "to do" lists, and shared enough pictures and uniform guides to inspire me to have a go at the uniforms, banners and flags as well. For a wargamer thinking of dipping their toe in Japanese waters then, it'd be hard to see how a one-volume guide to the period could be better put together.

Buy this book now from Amazon



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